IoT and Privacy: Friday Highlights Top Weekly Stories


Intertrust’s Friday Highlights provides a weekly review and analysis of a variety of articles that highlight trends in digital trust, Internet security, and Internet privacy. Here are the top IoT, connected car, and privacy stories from last week. 

 

Looking into the IoT Crystal Ball

 

The Internet of Things, or IoT, represents the next wave of innovation driving the computing technology market for the next 50 years. The possibilities represented by IoT drive Intertrust’s investments in IoT data companies, initiative to help secure connected cars, and its overall focus on IoT.  With 2015 just around the corner, there is a lot of discussion in the technology industry on the future of the IoT market.

IDC has released its 2015 list of predictions for IoT. Note the emphasis on security and analytics, areas Intertrust is actively investing in. 

IDC Reveals Worldwide Internet of Things Predictions for 2015
www.businesswire.com/news/home/20141203006197/en/IDC-Reveals-Worldwide-Internet-Predictions-2015#.VICQ7jHF98E

Another market research company has put out an aggressive IoT forecast. Radiant Insights forecast that by 2020, there will be 100 billion Internet connections, up from 9 billion in 2014. They also say the market for chips used in wireless sensor networks will reach $12 billion by 2020, compared to $2.7 billion in 2013. Certain IoT data companies are well positioned to benefit from this growth.

Chip Market for Wireless Sensor Networks on 23% CAGR
www.eetimes.com/document.asp?doc_id=1324800

This past week’s news revealed a variety of fascinating applications for IoT. Trust is essential to make these possibilities realand to successfully build the Internet of Trust

IoT, Trust, And The Emerging Market Of One
www.forbes.com/sites/robertvamosi/2014/12/03/iot-trust-and-the-emerging-market-of-one/

Here’s a prediction that in 2015, IoT will catch the eye of an important industry segment: marketing. The article is right in pointing out that marketers, along with everyone else, will be challenged to effectively analyze the vast volumes of IoT data. What it completely misses is the fact that unless marketers take action to ensure digital privacy and trust in their use of IoT data, individuals will  become increasingly unlikely to provide it to them.

When Will the Internet of Things Become a Thing? Next Year

www.emarketer.com/Article/Will-Internet-of-Things-Become-Thing-Next-Year/1011652#sthash.026qX72s.dpuf 

Biometric data will be an important subset of IoT data. Biometrics is likely to become a common method to authenticate individuals for IoT applications. Already, there is discussion in the industry of such things as a connected car authenticating drivers through facial or fingerprint recognition. IoT sensors are also shaping up to be an important source of biometric data. At least in Italy, regulators are moving to regulate biometric data.

New privacy rules on biometric data for the Internet of Things?
www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/new-privacy-rules-on-biometric-data-for-19236/

Internet Privacy: Facing the implications

As the Internet and Internet applications seep even further into individuals’ everyday lives as well as all aspects of business and government, society continues to grapple with the implications of internet privacy.

Speaking of Italy, here’s an example of the privacy implications of what seems to be a design issue with the popular chat app WhatsApp. This is a good cautionary tale as companies design IoT apps which handle sensitive data.

Having an affair in Italy? You may want to avoid using WhatsApp
www.globalpost.com/dispatch/news/regions/europe/141201/italy-whatsapp-divorce-infidelity-instant-messaging

In the US, there has been a lot of excitement around how the Internet can help revolutionize education and make it more accessible. Many Silicon Valley startups have been created to do just that. Now they are facing a political backlash due to the privacy implications of having access to sensitive data about students.

Online education run amok? 
www.politico.com/story/2014/11/online-education-run-amok-113208.html

Recently, the high flying Silicon Valley transportation startup Uber has had to face a very serious loss of trust due to questions about their privacy policies. Startups must address privacy in the beginning of their planning process, not just make it an add-on later.

#Ubergate Makes Plain That Privacy Cannot Be a Passing Thought for Start-Ups
www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/ubergate-makes-plain-that-privacy-canno-30290/

Facebook, another high flying Silicon Valley company, has seen its fair share of privacy dustups. Now there is third-party software available to block a Facebook feature which can be a potential privacy threat.

Adblock Plus can now prevent Facebook from telling senders you read their messages
venturebeat.com/2014/12/02/adblock-plus-can-now-prevent-facebook-from-telling-senders-you-read-their-message/

Friday Fun

The Holidays are  coming up fast! Here’s a service which combines the Silicon Valley trend of the sharing economy with the American trend of the ugly Christmas sweater party.

This Year You Can Rent Your Ugly Holiday Sweater
techcrunch.com/2014/12/04/this-year-you-can-rent-your-ugly-holiday-sweater/