Category Archives: Hurricanes

Hurricanes and Disaster Resilience: Does Data Present New Solutions?


On August 24, 2019, a tropical wave in the Central Atlantic developed into an extremely powerful, long-lived cyclone, Hurricane Dorian. Hurricane Dorian caused catastrophic damage to the northwestern Bahamas and caused significant destruction in the southeastern United States, and later Atlantic Canada. The hurricane left an estimated 70,000 people homeless and caused billions of dollars in material destruction.


Hurricanes and Disaster Resilience: Does Data Present New Solutions?


On August 24, 2019, a tropical wave in the Central Atlantic developed into an extremely powerful, long-lived cyclone, Hurricane Dorian. Hurricane Dorian caused catastrophic damage to the northwestern Bahamas and caused significant destruction in the southeastern United States, and later Atlantic Canada. The hurricane left an estimated 70,000 people homeless and caused billions of dollars in material destruction.

Hurricanes: Are Natural Disasters Getting Worse?


In 2017, Hurricane Harvey inundated Houston, Texas, causing many to lose their lives, property and faith in their emergency response services. A little more than a year later, towns across the Southern part of the United States experienced untold devastation; first from Hurricane Florence, then from Hurricane Michael. The frequency and severity of hurricanes and their profound effect on communities cannot not be disentangled from the wider pattern of warming that is changing our planet. The new reality is that extreme weather events will become more common and will require new levels of data-driven preparations. This week, our data integration engineer Eneli Toodu uses the NOAA OISST and the Planet OS Datahub API to derive a comparison between Hurricane Michael and Hurricane Florence.


Hurricanes: Are Natural Disasters Getting Worse?


In 2017, Hurricane Harvey inundated Houston, Texas, causing many to lose their lives, property and faith in their emergency response services. A little more than a year later, towns across the Southern part of the United States experienced untold devastation; first from Hurricane Florence, then from Hurricane Michael. The frequency and severity of hurricanes and their profound effect on communities cannot not be disentangled from the wider pattern of warming that is changing our planet. The new reality is that extreme weather events will become more common and will require new levels of data-driven preparations. This week, our data integration engineer Eneli Toodu uses the NOAA OISST and the Planet OS Datahub API to derive a comparison between Hurricane Michael and Hurricane Florence.